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HISTORY   AND   HUMAN   RELATIONS

from gaining the bottom class in a university examination
on the subject.

• Owing to the way in which the world has naturatyy
developed, owing to the pressing necessity for so many
lands of technique, owing to the fact which we have
already noticed—namely, that men can agree on the
subject of the effect of heat on water while they come
to differ radically when they rise to higher questions—
owing to these things, the most important sides of
education, and particularly the training in values, the
communication of an adequate world-outlook, have
come to be for the most part outside the framework of
an ordinary curriculum. This is not entirely to be
deplored, however, if the fact is faced a&id recognised,
and especially when the family plays its due part in the
education of the young; for we should hardly expect
a formal education to teach the most important things,
such as the aesthetics and the strategies of falling in love.
It might be understood, however, that when Christians
are teaching even the strictly technical kind of history,,
they in particular would remember the limits of the
science, the need for humility of mind, the importance
of getting inside human beings, the call for charity, the
dynamic quality of the spiritual factor in history. It
might be understood that they would see English
history as part of the story of a Christian civilisation
rather than a self-contained world, to be described with
patriotic innuendoes*

It remains true throughout, however, that in teaching
or reading or writing history the richest wisdom and
the finest educational nourishment comes from the